Audubon's Birds and Climate Change Report

314 Species on the Brink

Shrinking and shifting ranges could imperil nearly half of U.S. birds within this century

Burrowing Owl

By 2080, this diurnal owl species could lose 77 percent of its breeding range.

See the climate forecast map »

Erik Walker

Audubon's Birds and Climate Change Report

314 Species on the Brink

Shrinking and shifting ranges could imperil nearly half of U.S. birds within this century

Rufous Hummingbird

By 2080, this glittering hummingbird may lose 100 percent of its winter range in the U.S.

See the climate forecast map »

John Kieffer/Outside Imagery

Audubon's Birds and Climate Change Report

314 Species on the Brink

Shrinking and shifting ranges could imperil nearly half of U.S. birds within this century

Common Loon

By 2080, this great icon of the north could lose 75 percent of its winter range.

See the climate forecast map »

Jim Brandenburg/Minden Pictures/Corbis

Audubon's Birds and Climate Change Report

314 Species on the Brink

Shrinking and shifting ranges could imperil nearly half of U.S. birds within this century

Bald Eagle

The national symbol of the United States is projected to lose 73% of its current breeding range by 2080.

See the climate forecast map »

Greg Craybas

Audubon's Birds and Climate Change Report

314 Species on the Brink

Shrinking and shifting ranges could imperil nearly half of U.S. birds within this century.

Baird's Sparrow

By 2080, this grassland bird is expected to lose 100 percent of its current breeding range.

See the climate forecast map »

Tony Bynum

Explore the Impacts

Audubon’s findings classify 314 species—nearly half of all North American birds—as severely threatened by global warming. Our interactive maps show how each of these at-risk birds’ potential ranges could expand, contract, or shift in both summer and winter as our climate changes.

Use our geographical search to see how climate could affect birds near you.

Further Reading

Audubon magazine devoted its entire September/October 2014 issue to birds and climate change. Read a selection of the stories below, and browse the full issue here.

Gary Langham
Behind the Science

A Flight Plan for Birds in a Warming World

by Alisa Opar

Audubon's chief scientist is plotting a future for birds. Here's how they could survive.

View article

The Data

Changing Ranges: Why Bigger Isn’t Always Better

by Andrea Alfano

A number of the 314 climate-threatened species could see their ranges expand. Here’s why that’s a problem.

View article

The Data

Our Data, Your Visualizations

by Susan E. Matthews

Audubon’s Climate Change Report comes with a side of data. Here’s how news organizations are reimagining the message.

View article

Burning Forest
Big Picture

12 Views of a Warming World

by Raillan Brooks

Photographers capture a dozen scenes of a changing planet. 

View article

Common Loon 4

10 States Could Lose State Birds

by Manon Verchot

From Louisiana’s Brown Pelican to Minnesota’s Common Loon, ten state birds could leave the states that honor them by the end of this century.

View article

Amy Switzer ice sculpture Lake Nipissing Ontario
Psychology

Rethinking How We Think About Climate Change

by Elizabeth Kolbert

Beyond politics and paralysis lies a way forward—to action.

View article

Aerial photography of Phytoplankton blooms.
The Elements: Sea

How Climate Change is Sinking Seabirds

by Carl Safina

In warming oceans, seabirds’ food chains are headed straight to the bottom.

View article

Colbert Report Audubon report

Our Report, Your Reactions

by Purbita Saha

From Stephen Colbert to a Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award, here's what people think of Audubon’s Climate Change Report.

View article

Modeling Graph
Behind the Science

Why We Need Climate Models

by Terry L. Root

Computer models, while imperfect, may be the best shot we have for understanding what climate change will bring. 

View article

You Can Help

It's easier than you think to make a difference. Become a free Audubon member today to help birds facing climate change. 

Share Your Pledge

Thank you for pledging to help save the birds most at risk from global warming. But we need everyone’s help–and soon.

Share this urgent message with your friends and family. Tell them why these at-risk birds are so important to you, and ask them to pledge to do their part, too.

When you sign the pledge, you will begin receiving communications from Audubon. You can opt-out of these communications at any time.